Indow http://www.indowwindows.com Sat, 01 Oct 2016 01:16:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 How to Save Energy and Make an Old Home More Livable http://www.indowwindows.com/blog/save-energy-make-old-home-livable/ http://www.indowwindows.com/blog/save-energy-make-old-home-livable/#respond Mon, 29 Aug 2016 18:29:18 +0000 http://www.indowwindows.com/?p=9282 Do you live in an old home? Many of us here at Indow do and so we understand the glorious aspects as well as the challenges, which can include energy loss.  To save energy, you can do several things that will also make your old home more comfortable: air seal gaps and cracks in your windows, doors and crawl spaces, improve the insulation in your attic and walls and replace outdated heating and cooling systems. In our Window Hero Webinars, we usually focus on restoring and preserving historic windows. But those historic windows are always in old, often drafty homes that are difficult to make comfortable once the cold weather sets in. So we’re going to address the whole home in this upcoming webinar as we all prepare for cooler weather. And what better organization to talk about the whole home, than the nonprofit Enhabit here in Portland, Oregon. Enhabit educates and connects homeowners with home performance contractors who know how to make an old drafty home as comfortable as can be. Enhabit takes into account more than just how to save energy and create comfort. It considers health and safety too and educates people on hazards like radon, earthquake vulnerability and mold. Join us Thursday, Sept. 15 when home performance advisor Irie Searcy will give the next free Window Hero Webinar focused on your entire old home. She will give advice and answer questions.   When: Sept. 15, 2 p.m. (EDT), 11 a.m. (PDT) Where: Sign up for the free webinar here.   Enhabit has a nifty guide for people considering buying an older home with lots of things to think about to ensure it’s as energy efficient, comfortable and safe as possible. Like what, you ask?  Like: Cracks and gaps Uninsulated or poorly insulated. Outdated heating and cooling Radon Moisture buildup Allergens and air contaminants Asbestos Lead paint Vulnerability to earthquakes   That covers a lot! And since weatherization projects almost always have owners of old homes wondering what to do about their drafty windows, that brings to mind an excellent report done by the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Preservation Green Lab, Saving Windows, Saving Money: Evaulating the Energy Performance of Window Retrofit and Replacement. It’s important to read if you have thought at all about replacing your windows in the name of energy efficiency. The report demonstrates that it’s possible to retrofit old windows so they perform like high-end replacement windows at a fraction of the cost.

The post How to Save Energy and Make an Old Home More Livable appeared first on Indow.

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Window-Hero-Webinar-Series-Irie-SearcyDo you live in an old home? Many of us here at Indow do and so we understand the glorious aspects as well as the challenges, which can include energy loss.  To save energy, you can do several things that will also make your old home more comfortable: air seal gaps and cracks in your windows, doors and crawl spaces, improve the insulation in your attic and walls and replace outdated heating and cooling systems.

In our Window Hero Webinars, we usually focus on restoring and preserving historic windows. But those historic windows are always in old, often drafty homes that are difficult to make comfortable once the cold weather sets in. So we’re going to address the whole home in this upcoming webinar as we all prepare for cooler weather. And what better organization to talk about the whole home, than the nonprofit Enhabit here in Portland, Oregon. Enhabit educates and connects homeowners with home performance contractors who know how to make an old drafty home as comfortable as can be.

Enhabit takes into account more than just how to save energy and create comfort. It considers health and safety too and educates people on hazards like radon, earthquake vulnerability and mold.

Join us Thursday, Sept. 15 when home performance advisor Irie Searcy will give the next free Window Hero Webinar focused on your entire old home. She will give advice and answer questions.  

  1. When: Sept. 15, 2 p.m. (EDT), 11 a.m. (PDT)
  2. Where: Sign up for the free webinar here.

 

Enhabit has a nifty guide for people considering buying an older home with lots of things to think about to ensure it’s as energy efficient, comfortable and safe as possible.

Like what, you ask? 

Like:

  1. Cracks and gaps
  2. Uninsulated or poorly insulated.
  3. Outdated heating and cooling
  4. Radon
  5. Moisture buildup
  6. Allergens and air contaminants
  7. Asbestos
  8. Lead paint
  9. Vulnerability to earthquakes

 

That covers a lot! And since weatherization projects almost always have owners of old homes wondering what to do about their drafty windows, that brings to mind an excellent report done by the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Preservation Green Lab, Saving Windows, Saving Money: Evaulating the Energy Performance of Window Retrofit and Replacement.

It’s important to read if you have thought at all about replacing your windows in the name of energy efficiency. The report demonstrates that it’s possible to retrofit old windows so they perform like high-end replacement windows at a fraction of the cost.

The post How to Save Energy and Make an Old Home More Livable appeared first on Indow.

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Sam’s Climate Change Op-Ed in The Oregonian http://www.indowwindows.com/blog/company-news/sams-climate-change-op-ed-oregonian/ http://www.indowwindows.com/blog/company-news/sams-climate-change-op-ed-oregonian/#respond Wed, 27 Jul 2016 19:50:56 +0000 http://www.indowwindows.com/?p=9677 In the post-Brexit era of political hostility towards global treaties, we must reconsider our approach to dealing with climate change. Brexit revealed that the economic stresses climate change is sure to induce will undermine political support for mitigation measures that can be portrayed as harmful to a country’s economy. When seen through this lens, the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris (Conferences of the Parties, or COP21) accord has three fatal flaws. First, there is no enforcement mechanism. Second, the committed actions do not go far enough. Third, the entire framework could unravel if any major country departs dramatically from its commitments. It’s far too easy to contemplate failure scenarios. A country like China could try to escape a politically destabilizing economic crisis by reverting to inexpensive fossil fuels. Or the United States could fast forward destructive policies such as Keystone XL. There is little the community of nations could do in such scenarios, risking the tenuous progress made under Paris. Given the rapidly mounting consequences of carbon emissions, the world cannot afford stumbles like that. Fortunately, there is an alternative path that would move the world decisively towards a low carbon future. The good news for the planet and for those suspicious of international treaties is that much can be achieved through unilateral action by the United States of America. The first step would be for Congress to pass legislation that would institute a carbon tax that starts at $16 per ton and increases annually over 20 years to $50 per ton. To address concerns about the U.S. staying economically competitive, Congress would pass an import duty on manufactured goods from countries without an equivalent carbon tax. The import duty would phase in one year after the carbon tax and would increase in parallel. Similarly, U.S. companies that export goods to countries without an equivalent tax would receive a carbon tax credit so they can price their goods competitively. As other countries phased in their carbon taxes, the U.S. would lower its import duties and export credits for goods exchanged with those countries. The import duty tax and export tax credit would initially be set so the U.S. did not put its manufacturing industries at a competitive disadvantage. If other countries do not follow our lead, after five years our government and other participating countries could ratchet up the pressure by raising the import duties and export credits. Prior to passage, the U.S. would reach out to the other countries to invite them onto a similar track. While it’s no longer a unipolar political world, the U.S. is unquestionably a super power of consumption. If just the U.S. and the European Union or China reached an accord on this framework, they would exert sufficient economic leverage to encourage a critical mass of other countries to follow. Compliance could be monitored through technologies inspired by the various, successful nuclear arms control regimes. Satellite sensors can now monitor carbon emissions on a granular scale. These new taxes would generate considerable revenues that should be used first to address the economic dislocations they create. Give coal miners and others in carbon extraction industries vouchers for retraining. Next, reduce income taxes. Finally, we should know that even if we adopt the most aggressive decarbonization strategies possible, the genie is likely out of the bottle. The planet faces rising seas and increasingly chaotic weather that may displace hundreds of millions. We must help these climate refugees. The response to climate action encapsulated in the Paris accords will reduce only at the margins the terrible consequences of our carbon-based era. There is no time for hopeful half-measures that will easily be destabilized by the climate-caused economic and political dislocations we already know are certain to come. The 70 percent of U.S. citizens who accept the reality of climate change should know there is a viable path forward away from our current, tragic trajectory. The presidential election season is the time to demand action at town halls, in social media and at the ballot box. It’s time we put onto the agenda the practical, available steps to ensure future generations remember us with gratitude, not scorn. • Sam Pardue is the founder and CEO of Indow in Portland, which works to make “the built environment more energy efficient.”

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indow3-blog-title

In the post-Brexit era of political hostility towards global treaties, we must reconsider our approach to dealing with climate change. Brexit revealed that the economic stresses climate change is sure to induce will undermine political support for mitigation measures that can be portrayed as harmful to a country’s economy.

When seen through this lens, the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris (Conferences of the Parties, or COP21) accord has three fatal flaws. First, there is no enforcement mechanism. Second, the committed actions do not go far enough. Third, the entire framework could unravel if any major country departs dramatically from its commitments.

It’s far too easy to contemplate failure scenarios. A country like China could try to escape a politically destabilizing economic crisis by reverting to inexpensive fossil fuels. Or the United States could fast forward destructive policies such as Keystone XL. There is little the community of nations could do in such scenarios, risking the tenuous progress made under Paris. Given the rapidly mounting consequences of carbon emissions, the world cannot afford stumbles like that.

Fortunately, there is an alternative path that would move the world decisively towards a low carbon future. The good news for the planet and for those suspicious of international treaties is that much can be achieved through unilateral action by the United States of America.

The first step would be for Congress to pass legislation that would institute a carbon tax that starts at $16 per ton and increases annually over 20 years to $50 per ton. To address concerns about the U.S. staying economically competitive, Congress would pass an import duty on manufactured goods from countries without an equivalent carbon tax. The import duty would phase in one year after the carbon tax and would increase in parallel. Similarly, U.S. companies that export goods to countries without an equivalent tax would receive a carbon tax credit so they can price their goods competitively. As other countries phased in their carbon taxes, the U.S. would lower its import duties and export credits for goods exchanged with those countries.

The import duty tax and export tax credit would initially be set so the U.S. did not put its manufacturing industries at a competitive disadvantage. If other countries do not follow our lead, after five years our government and other participating countries could ratchet up the pressure by raising the import duties and export credits.

Prior to passage, the U.S. would reach out to the other countries to invite them onto a similar track. While it’s no longer a unipolar political world, the U.S. is unquestionably a super power of consumption. If just the U.S. and the European Union or China reached an accord on this framework, they would exert sufficient economic leverage to encourage a critical mass of other countries to follow.

Compliance could be monitored through technologies inspired by the various, successful nuclear arms control regimes. Satellite sensors can now monitor carbon emissions on a granular scale.

These new taxes would generate considerable revenues that should be used first to address the economic dislocations they create. Give coal miners and others in carbon extraction industries vouchers for retraining. Next, reduce income taxes. Finally, we should know that even if we adopt the most aggressive decarbonization strategies possible, the genie is likely out of the bottle. The planet faces rising seas and increasingly chaotic weather that may displace hundreds of millions. We must help these climate refugees.

The response to climate action encapsulated in the Paris accords will reduce only at the margins the terrible consequences of our carbon-based era. There is no time for hopeful half-measures that will easily be destabilized by the climate-caused economic and political dislocations we already know are certain to come.

The 70 percent of U.S. citizens who accept the reality of climate change should know there is a viable path forward away from our current, tragic trajectory. The presidential election season is the time to demand action at town halls, in social media and at the ballot box. It’s time we put onto the agenda the practical, available steps to ensure future generations remember us with gratitude, not scorn.

Sam Pardue is the founder and CEO of Indow in Portland, which works to make “the built environment more energy efficient.”

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How to Cool Your Home in Extreme Heat http://www.indowwindows.com/blog/how-to-cool-your-home/ http://www.indowwindows.com/blog/how-to-cool-your-home/#comments Mon, 25 Jul 2016 23:28:54 +0000 http://www.indowwindows.com/?p=9051 It’s hot in many parts of the country. Real hot. And extreme heat can be brutal, especially if your body has gotten use to refrigerated air. And let’s face it: many of our bodies have. Air conditioning is now just so common. In a few short decades, we’ve created a society that relies on it (raise your hand if you’ve ever had to put a sweater on inside in July!) because for a long time, we’ve been building our homes and commercial spaces without considering things people used to consider when they built: a structure’s orientation to the sun and winds, the number and position of windows, deep eaves, porches for cooling off, nearby trees that could provide shade. Instead, we built quickly and inexpensively and now, well, many of us are stuck with buildings that give us trouble when it’s hot. Hot weather is here to stay   The heat dome currently broiling a wide swath of the nation is straining air conditioners and running up electrical bills. If you don’t happen to have air conditioning, we have some ideas to help you cool off. If you do have air conditioning, we have some ideas that will ease the load on the grid and help you save money. Keep these ideas on file, because the hot weather isn’t going anywhere. Last year was the hottest on record and broke the last record by the largest margin ever: the global land and ocean surface temperature in 2015 was 1.62 F above the 20th century average, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. As the planet warms and some areas experience intense heat waves, how people cool their homes will have a tremendous impact on energy use and CO2 emissions that contribute to climate change.   In his groundbreaking book, Losing Our Cool: Uncomfortable Truths About Our Air-Conditioned World (and finding new ways to get through the summer), Stan Cox explains that energy consumed by home air conditioning in the U.S. doubled between 1993 and 2005. It jumped another 20 percent by 2010.  Using air conditioning to cool our buildings and vehicles creates an estimated half a billion metric tons of CO2 per year. “As the planet gets warmer, air conditioning is going to surpass heating as a force of greenhouse gas emissions,” Cox told Indow in an interview. “You don’t have to have that level of cooling to be comfortable, but if we relax what we’re aiming for . . .  it opens up other possibilities.” Ideas to beat the heat Below are a number of strategies that will keep a person’s air conditioner from working too hard and that will save money. Some of these solutions will help people cool off immediately – even if they don’t have an air conditioner – while others are more involved. The U.S. Department of Energy has done a lot of research on cooling strategies.  Here are some ways to cool your home. 1.Close and shade windows during the day to keep out the heat and non-visible infrared radiation.  2. In climates where the evening cools down, try for a “chimney effect” which relies on convection: open windows on the first floor or basement and windows at the top of the house on a second story. As the cool air moves through the room, it absorbs heat from the air and exits through upstairs windows. 3. Take advantage of double-hung windows once the day starts to cool: open the sashes at the top and bottom so hot stale air can escape the top while the opening at the bottom draws in cool air. 4. Place a bowl of ice cubes in front of a fan to cool down. 5. Sleep in the basement if there is one. 6. Don’t turn on stoves or ovens – grill outside instead or prepare food that doesn’t need to be cooked. 7. Use our Shade Grade window inserts to minimize solar heat gain.  They work beautifully.  8. Use an attic or whole house fan at night to draw cool air in through open windows.  9. Air seal and insulate the ceiling from the attic. 10, Plant deciduous shade trees on the west and east sides of the house. 11. Paint your roof white.  

The post How to Cool Your Home in Extreme Heat appeared first on Indow.

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shutterstock_199558004It’s hot in many parts of the country.

Real hot.

And extreme heat can be brutal, especially if your body has gotten use to refrigerated air. And let’s face it: many of our bodies have. Air conditioning is now just so common. In a few short decades, we’ve created a society that relies on it (raise your hand if you’ve ever had to put a sweater on inside in July!) because for a long time, we’ve been building our homes and commercial spaces without considering things people used to consider when they built: a structure’s orientation to the sun and winds, the number and position of windows, deep eaves, porches for cooling off, nearby trees that could provide shade. Instead, we built quickly and inexpensively and now, well, many of us are stuck with buildings that give us trouble when it’s hot.

Hot weather is here to stay  

The heat dome currently broiling a wide swath of the nation is straining air conditioners and running up electrical bills. If you don’t happen to have air conditioning, we have some ideas to help you cool off. If you do have air conditioning, we have some ideas that will ease the load on the grid and help you save money.

Keep these ideas on file, because the hot weather isn’t going anywhere. Last year was the hottest on record and broke the last record by the largest margin ever: the global land and ocean surface temperature in 2015 was 1.62 F above the 20th century average, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

As the planet warms and some areas experience intense heat waves, how people cool their homes will have a tremendous impact on energy use and CO2 emissions that contribute to climate change.  

In his groundbreaking book, Losing Our Cool: Uncomfortable Truths About Our Air-Conditioned World (and finding new ways to get through the summer), Stan Cox explains that energy consumed by home air conditioning in the U.S. doubled between 1993 and 2005. It jumped another 20 percent by 2010.  Using air conditioning to cool our buildings and vehicles creates an estimated half a billion metric tons of CO2 per year.

“As the planet gets warmer, air conditioning is going to surpass heating as a force of greenhouse gas emissions,” Cox told Indow in an interview. “You don’t have to have that level of cooling to be comfortable, but if we relax what we’re aiming for . . .  it opens up other possibilities.”

Ideas to beat the heat

Below are a number of strategies that will keep a person’s air conditioner from working too hard and that will save money. Some of these solutions will help people cool off immediately – even if they don’t have an air conditioner – while others are more involved. The U.S. Department of Energy has done a lot of research on cooling strategies.  Here are some ways to cool your home.

1.Close and shade windows during the day to keep out the heat and non-visible infrared radiation. 

2. In climates where the evening cools down, try for a “chimney effect” which relies on convection: open windows on the first floor or basement and windows at the top of the house on a second story. As the cool air moves through the room, it absorbs heat from the air and exits through upstairs windows.

3. Take advantage of double-hung windows once the day starts to cool: open the sashes at the top and bottom so hot stale air can escape the top while the opening at the bottom draws in cool air.

4. Place a bowl of ice cubes in front of a fan to cool down.

5. Sleep in the basement if there is one.

6. Don’t turn on stoves or ovens – grill outside instead or prepare food that doesn’t need to be cooked.

7. Use our Shade Grade window inserts to minimize solar heat gain.  They work beautifully. 

8. Use an attic or whole house fan at night to draw cool air in through open windows. 

9. Air seal and insulate the ceiling from the attic.

10, Plant deciduous shade trees on the west and east sides of the house.

11. Paint your roof white.

 

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VIP http://www.indowwindows.com/uncategorized/vip/ http://www.indowwindows.com/uncategorized/vip/#respond Mon, 20 Jun 2016 22:36:43 +0000 http://www.indowwindows.com/?p=8529 The post VIP appeared first on Indow.

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The Vision to Preserve Old Windows in Detroit: The Value of Steel Windows http://www.indowwindows.com/blog/company-news/vision-preserve-old-windows-detroit-value-steel-windows/ http://www.indowwindows.com/blog/company-news/vision-preserve-old-windows-detroit-value-steel-windows/#comments Thu, 19 May 2016 17:51:54 +0000 http://www.indowwindows.com/?p=8174 It was the destruction of  the historic J. L. Hudson Company Department Store that set Jim Turner on a career path to preserve old windows. Hudson’s had 2.1 million square feet of floor space with 32 floors and a world-record breaking 705 fitting rooms. In Detroit’s heyday, Hudson’s sold the height of fashion and anchored the downtown winter holiday season. But by 1983, it had closed. Jim, board president of Preservation Wayne in Detroit, argued restoring the building could drive economic development. The city demolished it for the same reason, hoping that clearing space in downtown would encourage the builders to come.  It didn’t. The lot Hudson’s stood on, Turner points out, is empty to this day. That experience galvanized preservation experts and Jim spearheaded forums showing people how they could affordably develop historic properties using tax credits. He worked on houses too. And as a gift, the owners of one of those houses gave him a two week immersion course at Pine Mountain Settlement School in Kentucky so he could become an expert at restoring historic wood and steel windows. Why focus on windows? That part of the story is rooted in his childhood in Ecorse Michigan, a suburb of Detroit. The oldest of 12 children, his family lived in low-income housing not far from a major steel mill as well as Ford and General Motors plants. Seeking quiet, he would walk along the streets, looking at single-family homes wondering what it would be like to live in one. He could see through the windows to a different future. “Looking at life from the streetscape and the rhythm of housing and housing stock – that could comfort you and warm you and make you feel secure in the surface that faced the street. Oftentimes, even today when I’m new in a community, I’d rather walk that community because I learn more about its character.” When he was drafted into the army, his mother bought a 1919 house in Detroit. The city is full of such homes as well as historic commercial structures that could be restored and preserved as an investment in the city’s future. He cites The Restoration Economy by Storm Cunningham and The Green Collar Economy by Van Jones in making his case. “We need to recognize the age of country and the age of the housing stock and the buildings we have and how we can best restore them and we can create job opportunity by moving towards a green economy – or a restorative economy,” he said. “Because it becomes a sustainable ethic or ethos. By doing so, we put people back to work instead of letting people go. We don’t have to do it in the context of creating – we are recreating what we already have.” As far as steel windows go, Jim contends they are as easy to restore as wood ones although many working in wood believe otherwise, he said.  With wood, you can cut a dutchman or patch and glue it into place. Working with metal windows is much the same except that instead of cutting wood and gluing you are cutting metal and welding. “In many instances, if they employed the same craftsmanship and understanding of the metal window, they could do the work as efficiently and professionally as they are doing in wood.” Learn more about restoring steel windows from Jim at our upcoming Window Hero Webinar on Tuesday, March 24. Please sign up for the free webinar. Jim is an adviser in Michigan for the National Trust for Historic Preservation. He said he’s repaying the gift he received to become a steel windows preservation expert by working as the  Executive Director of Samuel Plato Academy of Preservation Trades in Louisville, Kentucky.

The post The Vision to Preserve Old Windows in Detroit: The Value of Steel Windows appeared first on Indow.

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ID1614_2_Hudsons_1950sIt was the destruction of  the historic J. L. Hudson Company Department Store that set Jim Turner on a career path to preserve old windows. Hudson’s had 2.1 million square feet of floor space with 32 floors and a world-record breaking 705 fitting rooms. In Detroit’s heyday, Hudson’s sold the height of fashion and anchored the downtown winter holiday season. But by 1983, it had closed. Jim, board president of Preservation Wayne in Detroit, argued restoring the building could drive economic development.

The city demolished it for the same reason, hoping that clearing space in downtown would encourage the builders to come.  It didn’t. The lot Hudson’s stood on, Turner points out, is empty to this day.

That experience galvanized preservation experts and Jim spearheaded forums showing people how they could affordably develop historic properties using tax credits. He worked on houses too. And as a gift, the owners of one of those houses gave him a two week immersion course at Pine Mountain Settlement School in Kentucky so he could become an expert at restoring historic wood and steel windows.

Why focus on windows? That part of the story is rooted in his childhood in Ecorse Michigan, a suburb of Detroit. The oldest of 12 children, his family lived in low-income housing not far from a major steel mill as well as Ford and General Motors plants. Seeking quiet, he would walk along the streets, looking at single-family homes wondering what it would be like to live in one.

He could see through the windows to a different future.

“Looking at life from the streetscape and the rhythm of housing and housing stock – that could comfort you and warm you and Jim-Turner-vintage-vert-LRmake you feel secure in the surface that faced the street. Oftentimes, even today when I’m new in a community, I’d rather walk that community because I learn more about its character.”

When he was drafted into the army, his mother bought a 1919 house in Detroit. The city is full of such homes as well as historic commercial structures that could be restored and preserved as an investment in the city’s future. He cites The Restoration Economy by Storm Cunningham and The Green Collar Economy by Van Jones in making his case.

“We need to recognize the age of country and the age of the housing stock and the buildings we have and how we can best restore them and we can create job opportunity by moving towards a green economy – or a restorative economy,” he said. “Because it becomes a sustainable ethic or ethos. By doing so, we put people back to work instead of letting people go. We don’t have to do it in the context of creating – we are recreating what we already have.”

As far as steel windows go, Jim contends they are as easy to restore as wood ones although many working in wood believe otherwise, he said.  With wood, you can cut a dutchman or patch and glue it into place. Working with metal windows is much the same except that instead of cutting wood and gluing you are cutting metal and welding.

“In many instances, if they employed the same craftsmanship and understanding of the metal window, they could do the work as efficiently and professionally as they are doing in wood.”

Learn more about restoring steel windows from Jim at our upcoming Window Hero Webinar on Tuesday, March 24. Please sign up for the free webinar.

Jim is an adviser in Michigan for the National Trust for Historic Preservation. He said he’s repaying the gift he received to become a steel windows preservation expert by working as the  Executive Director of Samuel Plato Academy of Preservation Trades in Louisville, Kentucky.

The post The Vision to Preserve Old Windows in Detroit: The Value of Steel Windows appeared first on Indow.

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Mid-Century Modern Windows and the “House of Tomorrow Tour” http://www.indowwindows.com/blog/mid-century/ http://www.indowwindows.com/blog/mid-century/#respond Thu, 05 May 2016 18:41:25 +0000 http://www.indowwindows.com/?p=7917 Mid-century modern homes were once futuristic, the “homes of tomorrow.” Built after World War II, they incorporated the abundant and relatively inexpensive materials no longer needed for the war effort in features like aluminum windows and steel cabinets.

The post Mid-Century Modern Windows and the “House of Tomorrow Tour” appeared first on Indow.

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Mid-century modern homes were once futuristic, the “homes of tomorrow.” Built after World War II, they incorporated the abundant and relatively inexpensive materials no longer needed for the war effort in features like aluminum windows and steel cabinets. High-tech kitchen gadgets such as built in rotisseries featured prominently as Americans focused on leisure and entertaining after years of austerity. Today these homes are historic, but their design and aesthetics are as popular as ever: the clean lines, light-filled spaces and embrace of modern materials like plastic whether for countertops or chairs . If you love mid-century modern, you’ll love Restore Oregon’s
2016 Mid-Century Modern House of Tomorrow Tour. The goal is to engender thoughtful preservation of modern architecture. 

Indow is proud to sponsor the companion talk the night before the tour, “The Mid-Century House: A Vision of Tomorrow. Windows and light are often a focal point of mid-century modern homes and Indow is dedicated to preserving original windows, which are often central to a home’s character. And we’ve got a thing for mid-century modern dwellings. Maybe in part because one helped us find Indow’s creative director, Michael Hofler, who was looking to make his mid-century modern windows more energy efficient.

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Another preservation project made us particularly happy: Greg Nieberding and his partner, Eddie Ortega, had bought a 1959 mid-century modern in Dallas, Texas after others made offers to tear it down – even though it was so cool the previous owners had entertained Frank Sinatra and Doris Day there! Greg and Eddie saw the carrara marble, the red oak molding that makes the walls look like Japanese shoji screens and large windows and knew it was special. During their full-scale restoration, they used Indow inserts to eliminate condensation in the clerestory mid-century modern windows in the bedroom.


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Mid-century modern homes in temperate climates often don’t have storms and as they age, the owners wonder what to do about the windows, which often have aluminium frames. Indow inserts are an ideal solution for making those windows energy efficient while preserving their original character.

Speaking of metal windows, if you have them, you might be interested in our next Window Hero Webinar with preservation expert Jim Turner who will discuss the value of preserving and restoring original steel windows for both homes and commercial spaces. Sign up for this free webinar!  

window-hero-button-2016

Finally, we’ve come across some great resources if you’re interested in mid-century modern homes. One is this list of mid-century modern do’s and don’ts by the  nonprofit Chicago Bauhaus and Beyond for those who just bought a mid-century modern. The basic message: live in the house before you change anything so that you can learn to appreciate all the details. Also, you might be interested in the magazines Atomic Ranch and Retro Renovation, both of which Greg and Eddie like to consult.

If you want to go:

2016 Mid-Century Modern House of Tomorrow Tour

The tour is Saturday, May 14 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. leaving from the Tenth Church of Christ Scientist, 5736 SE 17th Ave, Portland, OR 97202. Buy tickets here.

Tickets for the evening talk the day before, “The Mid-Century House: A Vision of Tomorrow,”  can be bought here.

If you want to watch:

Free Window Hero Webinar with Jim Turner.

Preservation expert Jim Turner will discuss the value of preserving and restoring original steel windows for both homes and commercial spaces. Jim has spent 30 years in Detroit, Michigan as an advocate, activist and skilled craftsman in the world of window restoration, helping to bring some of that city’s beautiful old buildings back to life.

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Blocking Window Heat in a Victorian Inn http://www.indowwindows.com/portfolio/blocking-window-heat/ http://www.indowwindows.com/portfolio/blocking-window-heat/#respond Wed, 04 May 2016 20:50:22 +0000 http://www.indowwindows.com/?post_type=portfolio&p=7860 The Lang House is an 1881 Queen Anne Victorian inn with all its original single-pane windows near the heart of downtown Burlington, Vermont. Because of its lovely but old windows, it had trouble with extreme temperature fluctuations. In the winter, the cold pierced them. In the summer, the oppressive heat forced its way in. Blocking window heat was a priority even though the house had exterior storms, which protected from the elements but didn’t provide much insulation. Then the inn installed Indow inserts in 45 windows. The idea was to block the cold drafts. But as it grew hot with transition to summer, the managers realized the inserts were also helping block out the intense summer heat that used to bake the common areas. Guests were more comfortable, and the window air conditioning units didn’t have to work as hard. “It cuts down on air conditioning loss,” said Andy Hard of Lang House. “It’s creating an impermeable barrier.” The sun porch has 11 inserts. In the summer, innkeepers take out just two – one for the air conditioning unit and one to get a fresh breeze. The rest stay in so they can continue blocking window heat. Not only does the house stay cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter, but it’s also much quieter. The inn is located within walking distance of the University of Vermont campus and there’s usually a lot of traffic and voices on the street. The inserts hushed all that, Andy said. “It’s noticeable how much quieter the guest rooms are.” Click to learn how another home owner insulated their Queen Anne Windows. 

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The Lang House is an 1881 Queen Anne Victorian inn with all its original single-pane windows near the heart of downtown Burlington, Vermont. Because of its lovely but old windows, it had trouble with extreme temperature fluctuations. In the winter, the cold pierced them. In the summer, the oppressive heat forced its way in. Blocking window heat was a priority even though the house had exterior storms, which protected from the elements but didn’t provide much insulation.Blocking window heat was critical to the owners of this Victorian B&B.

Then the inn installed Indow inserts in 45 windows. The idea was to block the cold drafts. But as it grew hot with transition to summer, the managers realized the inserts were also helping block out the intense summer heat that used to bake the common areas. Guests were more comfortable, and the window air conditioning units didn’t have to work as hard.

“It cuts down on air conditioning loss,” said Andy Hard of Lang House. “It’s creating an impermeable barrier.”

The sun porch has 11 inserts. In the summer, innkeepers take out just two – one for the air conditioning unit and one to get a fresh breeze. The rest stay in so they can continue blocking window heat.

Indow inserts to insulate Queen Anne windows

Not only does the house stay cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter, but it’s also much quieter. The inn is located within walking distance of the University of Vermont campus and there’s usually a lot of traffic and voices on the street.

The inserts hushed all that, Andy said.

“It’s noticeable how much quieter the guest rooms are.”

Click to learn how another home owner insulated their Queen Anne Windows

Lang-House-Vermont-Vintage-Wide-2

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Celebrate Earth Day with Individual Climate Action http://www.indowwindows.com/blog/celebrate-earth-day-individual-climate-action/ http://www.indowwindows.com/blog/celebrate-earth-day-individual-climate-action/#respond Fri, 22 Apr 2016 15:54:31 +0000 http://www.indowwindows.com/?p=7674 So 2015 was the hottest year on record. Not only that, but it broke the last record by the largest margin ever. In 2015, the global land and ocean surface temperature was 1.62 F above the 20th century average, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Fifteen of the 16 warmest years on record have occurred since 2001. And now the first 3 months of 2016 are the hottest still, by a whopping .7 degrees F.   That’s pretty overwhelming. Would we take a real, bonafide Zombie apocalypse over global warming? Maybe so. But runaway CO2 and methane emissions are the scourge, not renegade viruses. The historic Paris Climate Accord in December saw 195 nations commit to lowering greenhouse gas emissions. Lots of sweeping ideas and plans are being discussed and enacted as the devastating effects of climate change become undeniable. While it’s comforting to imagine that governments will solve all our problems, I still feel there is an urgent need for all of us, as individuals, to do all that we can. Right now. It’s easy to shrink from climate news. On Facebook, my posts on the topic seem to have the lowest ratio of importance to popularity. I imagine my friends clicking over to The Walking Dead instead of responding. But moving beyond words to action is how you can communicate with greater power. Composting. Biking over driving. Recycling. Not buying so much stuff. Planting a garden to grow some of your own food. Investing in an electric car. There is a long list. What I’ve come to recognize is that while these steps matter on their own, they also communicate to others that climate action matters. When we started a composting program at Indow, it signaled to every member of our team that small steps are important. When one employee sees another riding to work on a cold, rainy February day, that person gets a message more powerful than a memo. And the more you do something, the more of a habit it becomes until it isn’t a sacrifice but an act you enjoy. I prefer to ride my bike now, right through Portland’s rainy winters! Making something a habit creates greater bandwidth to take new actions. This Earth Day, reflect on the great power you have to create changes, large and small, and in doing so shine your light in this beautiful world.

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shutterstock_127710809So 2015 was the hottest year on record. Not only that, but it broke the last record by the largest margin ever. In 2015, the global land and ocean surface temperature was 1.62 F above the 20th century average, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Fifteen of the 16 warmest years on record have occurred since 2001. And now the first 3 months of 2016 are the hottest still, by a whopping .7 degrees F.  

That’s pretty overwhelming. Would we take a real, bonafide Zombie apocalypse over global warming? Maybe so. But runaway CO2 and methane emissions are the scourge, not renegade viruses.

The historic Paris Climate Accord in December saw 195 nations commit to lowering greenhouse gas emissions. Lots of sweeping ideas and plans are being discussed and enacted as the devastating effects of climate change become undeniable. While it’s comforting to imagine that governments will solve all our problems, I still feel there is an urgent need for all of us, as individuals, to do all that we can. Right now.

It’s easy to shrink from climate news. On Facebook, my posts on the topic seem to have the lowest ratio of importance to popularity. I imagine my friends clicking over to The Walking Dead instead of responding. But moving beyond words to action is how you can communicate with greater power. Composting. Biking over driving. Recycling. Not buying so much stuff. Planting a garden to grow some of your own food. Investing in an electric car. There is a long list. What I’ve come to recognize is that while these steps matter on their own, they also communicate to others that climate action matters. When we started a composting program at Indow, it signaled to every member of our team that small steps are important. When one employee sees another riding to work on a cold, rainy February day, that person gets a message more powerful than a memo.

And the more you do something, the more of a habit it becomes until it isn’t a sacrifice but an act you enjoy. I prefer to ride my bike now, right through Portland’s rainy winters! Making something a habit creates greater bandwidth to take new actions. This Earth Day, reflect on the great power you have to create changes, large and small, and in doing so shine your light in this beautiful world.

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Eliminating Window Condensation in a Mid-Century Modern http://www.indowwindows.com/portfolio/eliminate-window-condensation/ http://www.indowwindows.com/portfolio/eliminate-window-condensation/#respond Thu, 31 Mar 2016 19:25:47 +0000 http://www.indowwindows.com/?post_type=portfolio&p=7423 The house was built in 1959 for dress designer Ed Cupaioli and his wife Margaret, an NBC radio and Broadway singer. It is a mid-century modern with carrara marble flooring throughout, with red oak molding.

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The house was built in 1959 for dress designer Ed Cupaioli and his wife Margaret, an NBC radio and Broadway singer. It is a mid-century modern with carrara marble flooring throughout, red oak molding that makes the walls look like Japanese shoji screens, large windows and a free form pool outback. The couple entertained in the house, which saw its share of illustrious guests: Tony Bennett, Frank Sinatra, Doris Day, Ann Miller. It is easy to picture them there.

When Mrs. Cupaioli died at 96 and the property went up for sale in 2012, prospective buyers made offers to tear it down and build something new. Greg Nieberding and his partner, Eddie Ortega, bought it to restore and preserve. A gem. The house was designed by Jack Wood, who studied under Eliel Saarinen at Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomfield, Michigan. One of his classmates, Greg said, was Florence Knoll of Knoll furniture.

“It’s the coolest house I’ve ever seen – and I’ve seen them in Palm Springs – this one takes the cake in my book.”

They preserved as much as they could, including the metal turquoise Geneva kitchen cabinets.

Eliminating window condensation while preserving aesthetics

But the roof needed replacing. And they had window condensation problems with the clerestory windows in the bedroom above the long row of sliding closets (Mr. Cupaioli was a dress designer after all). Since the glass was basically built into the walls, it would have been a major project to replace them. Such window challenges aren’t uncommon in custom-designed mid-century modern homes, but eliminating window condensation can be tricky. Greg and Eddie turned to Indow window inserts which insulate sound and block moisture from reaching the window panes. They selected Indow’s Standard Grade inserts.

Not only did the window condensation vanish, but the drafts did too. And it became quieter.

And the inserts corrected the flaws around the edge of the tinting Greg had applied to the clerestory windows. The Indow inserts gave it a finished look.

“I couldn’t be more pleased,” he said. “The profile is very small.”

It’s in a gated community with friendly neighbors. Former President George W. Bush and his wife, Laura, welcomed Greg and Eddie by knocking on the door and presenting a book and handmade Christmas ornament the former president painted in his spare time.

Greg said he’s pretty sure Mrs. Cupaioli would be happy with what he and his partner have done to restore the house.

“We get the most incredibly warm feeling from this house,” said Greg. “I’ve never felt more at home… I feel like I’ve been blessed with this great opportunity. I can’t imagine someone thinking of tearing it down.”

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Indow Inserts Featured On This Old House http://www.indowwindows.com/portfolio/indow-inserts-featured-on-this-old-house/ http://www.indowwindows.com/portfolio/indow-inserts-featured-on-this-old-house/#respond Fri, 25 Mar 2016 21:54:41 +0000 http://www.indowwindows.com/?post_type=portfolio&p=7333 How do you block drafts in unusually shaped windows like arches or half rounds? This was the question facing Katherine and Murat Bicer as This Old House completely renovated their 1895 Victorian in Belmont, Massachusetts.

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How do you block drafts in unusually shaped windows like arches or half rounds?

This was the question facing Katherine and Murat Bicer as This Old House completely renovated their 1895 Victorian in Belmont, Massachusetts. The couple didn’t want to cover these single-pane beauties with exterior storms but they didn’t want to ignore them either since they were especially drafty. Not when This Old House was bringing their historic dwelling back to life from the foundation to the rafters for a 16-part television series.

“We really care a lot about our windows,” said Katherine Bicer. “We’ve gotten pretty crazy about them.”

As they were talking with This Old House producers, Indow came up. They decided to call and see if it was possible to have interior thermal window inserts made for the arched Victorian windows upstairs. It was: Indow regularly makes special geometry window inserts from batwings to rounds.

On one of the arched windows that opened, Indow divided it with the company’s custom mullion bracket so the Bicers could remove just the lower Indow insert if they wanted to open the window for a fresh breeze. They also later ordered a Privacy Grade insert for one of the windows so they could maintain privacy but still enjoy light.

“We love them,” said Katherine. “You can barely see them – they don’t impact the way a window looks at all. They sit so perfectly. And definitely one of the huge pros of the Indow insert is that you don’t have the profile of the storm window on the exterior of the house.”

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